Utagawa Hiroshige (Ando) (Japanese, 1797-1858). <em>Aoi Slope, Outside Toranomon Gate, No. 113 from One Hundred Famous Views of Edo</em>, 11th month of 1857. Woodblock print, Sheet: 14 3/16 x 9 1/4 in. (36 x 23.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Anna Ferris, 30.1478.113 (Photo: Brooklyn Museum, 30.1478.113_PS1.jpg)

Aoi Slope, Outside Toranomon Gate, No. 113 from One Hundred Famous Views of Edo

Artist:Utagawa Hiroshige (Ando)

Medium: Woodblock print

Geograhical Locations:

Dates:11th month of 1857

Dimensions: Sheet: 14 3/16 x 9 1/4 in. (36 x 23.5 cm) Image: 13 3/8 x 8 3/4 in. (34 x 22.2 cm)

Collections:

Exhibitions:

Accession Number: 30.1478.113

Image: 30.1478.113_PS1.jpg,

Catalogue Description:
To the left in this view is the Aoi Slope of the title, along which some people, obviously chilled by the cold air, are walking with the aid of their lanterns. The water pouring over the spillway to the right is the overflow from Tameike Pond, which fell into the Outer Moat and passed by the Toranomon Gate (not seen here). The two large barren trees to the left are hackberry trees from which Enoki Slope (further to the left) took its name. At right is Sanno Hill and the gray temple buildings of Sanno Shrine. In the foreground, the two almost naked figures are artisan apprentices; it was their custom at the coldest time of the year to visit temples and shrines at night and bathe in the icy water and offer prayers to the gods for the refinement of their skills. The younger apprentice carries a lantern which bears the name of the shrine god, Konpira Daigongen, while the older one is ringing a small bell. Behind the stray dogs are the portable stalls of noodle vendors, hung with red lanterns. Tameike Pond was drained and leveled in the mid-1880's and Aoi Slope now survives as a street in front of Toranomon Hospital.

Brooklyn Museum